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First meeting’s roll call

Z and S of Citiparks

Thanks to everyone for attending! Sadly, we didn't get a group photo as there was plenty to talk about. 

First Name

Last Name

Role

Organization

Aaron


Workman

training service in aquatic in PA & NY

American Red Cross

Andrew


Grobe 

Assistant Deputy Director of Recreation

Allegheny County Parks

Cait

Waxler

Cell

American Red Cross

Jen

Wagner


Boy Scouts

Karen

Arnold

Athletics

Pittsburgh Public Schools

Kathryn 

Vargas

Director's office

Citiparks, City of Pittsburgh

Leah


Durand 

Teenspace

Carnegie Library, Oakland

Luke

Borowy

Aquatics Manager

Sandcastle Water Park

Marie

Harrison 

Cell

Partner4Work

Mark

Rauterkus

Exec. Director / Head Lifeguard / Coach

SKWIM USA & The Pittsburgh Project & The Ellis School

Michael


Jordan 

Lifeguard 

The Pittsburgh Project

Mona


Jordan Hawkins

Chief Operating Office

Kingsley Association

Rachelle

Quinn

Employment Center

Bloomfield Garfield Corp

Rev. Glenn

Grayson

Host

Center That Cares

Rick

Swartz

CEO of nonprofit

Bloomfield Garfield Corp

Rick

Flanagan

Co-organizer

Lifeguard Recruitment Initiative

Ron

Cashdollar

Operations

The Pittsburgh Project

Roxanne

Thomas

Cell

Mistick Construction Co.

Ryan

Eldridge

Director of the Physical Education department

Pittsburgh Public Schools

Savanah

Edmonds

Lifeguard

The Pittsburgh Project

Sean


Haupt 

Associate VP, Aquatics & Youth Sports

YMCA of Greater Pgh and also swim coach at Plum High School

Shannon


Vargesko

 HR Specialist

YMCA of Greater Pgh

Shelley 

Terlecki

Aquatics

Citiparks, City of Pittsburgh

Zoom Call Details for remote and delayed listening to the initial meeting of the Lifeguard Recruitment Initiative

Connection Details for the Zoom Call, 9 am, November 13

Everyone can't be a lifeguard on the chair in St. Pete, Florida -- and -- everyone can't be at the initial meeting in Pittsburgh for the Lifeguard Recruitment Initiative.

Topic: Pgh Lifeguard Recruitment Meeting

  • Time: Nov 13, 2019 08:45 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
  • Duration: 2 hrs

To join the Zoom Meeting:

One tap mobile

  • +16468769923,,150793950# US (New York)
  • +16699006833,,150793950# US (San Jose)

Dial by your location

  •         +1 646 876 9923 US (New York)
  •         +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)

Meeting ID: 150 793 950

Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/ad52xVk90D .


Agenda points from Mark Rauterkus

  • Group photo
  • Anyone else can help with Guard.4Rs.org as a webmaster, as I love open-source.
  • Desire swim teams to become more vigilant in training lifeguards
  • Formation of Collegiate Lifeguard Clubs, as well as clubs at the High Schools. Back in the day, at New Trier, one of the largest clubs was "The Guard." 
  • Get Lifeguards to march in the Labor Day Parade, perhaps with first responders (Firefighters, EMS, Police and even Nurses)

Agenda for the first meeting of the Lifeguard Recruitment Initiative, November 13, 2019

Time: 9 AM

Location: Jeron X. Grayson Community Center

1852 Enoch Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Contacts:

  • Rick Flanagan, Project Coordinator
  • Rickflanagan2010@gmail.com
  • Cell 412-913-4360
  • Mark Rauterkus, Project Coordinator
  • Mark.Rauterkus@gmail.com
  • Cell 412-298-3432

Meeting Agenda:

  1. Introduction of organizations that can hire lifeguards, train and certify new lifeguards, and help identify lifeguard candidates
  2. Brief overview of the Lifeguard Initiative goals and action items
    1. Defining the need for lifeguards and timing issues related to acquiring staff
    2. Move into action as it relates to recruiting existing lifeguards and recruiting those that would be interested in becoming lifeguards
    3. Training a large numbers of individuals that want to be lifeguards
    4. Linking individuals that are lifeguard certified to organizations that need lifeguards
    5. Determine the role that each organization wants to play
  3. Defining the need for lifeguards
  4. What would a recruit campaign look like in order to recruit high school and college age youth along with older adults? What resources are needed?
  5. Assuming we get a large number of people who would like to be lifeguards, how do they get trained and certified?
  6. What system could be put in place that those individuals that acquire a lifeguard certificate understand their hiring options? How do the organizations that need lifeguards promote their lifeguarding opportunities?
  7. Clearly defined next steps

Original call to participate in the new campaign

Lifeguard RECRUITMENT Initiative — Join In!

From: Rick Flanagan, Volunteer Project Coordinator

To: Lifeguard Recruitment Stakeholders, October 31, 2019      

Mark Rauterkus and I are in the process of bringing together organizational leadership that seeks to collaborate on a campaign to identify individuals that would like to be trained and certified as lifeguards. Once certified, these individuals can choose a place of employment with various organizations that need their services. 

Allegheny County, City of Pittsburgh, and many other organizations are in great need of lifeguards. One of my personal goals is to increase the number of certified lifeguards among the lower-income, black students in both high school and college. Plus, the aim is to provide job placements at pools across the city this summer.

A city-wide, and perhaps regional, leadership group will meet on matters related to lifeguarding on Nov. 13th at 9 am. Meeting location is at the Jeron X. Grayson Community Center, 1852 Enoch Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219. My hope is that leadership from the Pittsburgh Public Schools, Allegheny County, City of Pittsburgh, and a variety of other youth serving agencies will participate. The meeting is open to any organization that wants to engage in this matter.

The agenda is focused upon clearly defining the needs for individuals and our community in this employment process. We’ll brainstorm as a collaborative network to get more individuals trained and certified. We will also talk about the recruitment of candidates and job placement. By attending you can gain a better understanding of the lifeguard initiative and define a role you can play.

Please confirm your commitment to attend by emailing Rickflanagan2010@gmail.com or by calling or texting 412-913-4360. Mark will also be taking confirmations at mark.rauterkus@gmail.com

Please do your best to confirm your attendance within the next few days. Hope to see you on November 13th.

Contact info:

  • Rick Flanagan, Project Coordinator

  • Rickflanagan2010@gmail.com
  • Cell 412-913-4360
  •  Mark Rauterkus, Project Coordinator

  • Mark.Rauterkus@gmail.com
  • Cell 412-298-3432

Updates:

Hope to see plenty of the leaders in aquatics at this first meeting, 9 am on Wednesday, November 13, 2019, at the Grayson Community Center in Pittsburgh. 

Academic paper on the drowning chain of survival

Looking at the first link

PREVENT DROWNING - Be safe in & around the water 

 It has been estimated that most drownings are preventable.

The ability to avoid a drowning contrasts withthe high rates of poor outcomes following these type of incidents. Drowning requires multiple layers ofprotection. To be effective, drowning prevention must be used by individuals near, on or around the water, andthose who supervise or care for others in water settings.

MAJOR ADVICE ACTIONS

  • Stay within arm’s reach of children when in or near the water 
  • Swim in water-safe areas where there lifeguards
  • Fence pools, spas and other aquatic with 4-sided or any fencing
  • Always wear a lifejacket when using watercraft (eg. Boat, kayak etc.)
  • Learn how to swim and water-safety survival skills.

Signs of trouble

Here are the major signs a child may be drowning, and they may be dramatically different than what you expect:

There will be no call for help: If you can’t breathe, you can’t speak or yell.

You may see their mouths sinking and bobbing back up repeatedly: If you see bobbing going on, you should check on the kid who is doing it. He could be in distress and you might be missing the signs.

They won’t be waving for help: Their instinct is to use their hands to pull their mouths out of the water so they can breathe, not wave for help.

They won’t be able to help their rescuer: They won’t be able to call attention to themselves, grab onto rescue equipment, or reach out for a lifeguard.

They are upright in the water and may not be kicking: If you see a child who is upright and not kicking, along with any of these other signs, get to them as soon as possible.

The incident happens quickly: A person who is drowning doesn’t have much time -- they can only struggle for 20 to 60 seconds before they go under.

A child isn’t making any noise: As every parent can tell you, children who are playing in the water make a lot of noise. If your child can’t be heard anymore when she’s playing in the water, assume something is wrong.

Source: gibsonins.com

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